Jasmine Absolute Essential Oil

Jasmine Absolute Essential Oil

Benefits of Jasmine Essential Oil

Scientific studies show Jasmine Absolute to be effective for anxiety, sleep, hormones, happiness, and fatigue. This is why you want to apply it to your body as part of a lotion or oil every day.

  • Help lift emotions associated with anxiety & nervous tension
  • Deeper, more restful quality of sleep
  • Natural balance of hormones: PMS; mood swings & hot flashes, libido
  • Promote greater feelings of optimism and happiness
  • Uplift fatigue, increase alertness & cognitive performance[1]

These 5 effects show that Jasmine essential oil may be especially beneficial for CalmComfort, and Joy E-types to be using on a daily basis. What's your E-type?

Jasmine essential oil has been revered for centuries around the world for a variety of emotional benefits. European health programs highly value jasmine for helping to stabilize moods by working on the nervous system. It is considered both yin and yang - this means that wherever you may be weak, it can assist in creating harmony and balance by stimulating or sedatating both your body and emotions.

Jasmine beckons with a distinct exotic aroma that is floral, musky, sweet and sensual all at once. This premium essential oil has a unique ability to help both relax and uplift at the same time. It balances being strong, rich, warm and graceful…making sense that jasmine is called the King of Flowers.

The Evidence Supporting Jasmine

1) Research at Wheeling Jesuit University by Dr. Bryan Raudenbush, assistant professor of psychology, shows dispensing jasmine odor into a room where participants were sleeping “led to greater sleep efficiency and reduced sleep movement.” The research showed greater quality of sleep even though there wasn’t more quantity of sleep.

Participants who breathed jasmine in the air “rated their level of anxiety and vigor lower, and performed cognitive tests more rapidly.” In addition, “level of alertness in the jasmine odor condition was greater during the afternoon hours, thus helping maintain students’ focus on academic work throughout the day.”[2]

2) The Journal Of Health Research from the College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University in Thailand, reported that jasmine essential oil stimulates beta brain waves (brain alertness & thinking), as well as moods and nervous system. One test report showed “exposure to jasmine oil increased positive emotions including feelings of well being, active, fresh and romantic.” It goes on to say, “negative emotions such as feeling drowsy were significantly reduced.”[3]

DID YOU KNOW....

Jasmine's nickname is “queen of the night” because it reveals its greatest blooms, beauty and strongest scent at dark. Many emotions can come to the forefront especially in the quiet of night; jasmine has a special talent for soothing, stabilizing and balancing those emotions. Because of its power at night, the oil has also been used for centuries to get the libido stimulated by its seductive and luscious scent, which naturally increases one’s sensuality at dark.

For instance, jasmine has been used in India since ancient times. The oil, revered sacred by the Hindu God of erotic love and pleasure, named Kama, who is similar to our Cupid, would first dip the tip of his sugar cane arrow into jasmine oil before shooting his target of love.

The oil has an effect on our biology similar to when we are aroused. In fact, a study done by applying the oil on participants abdomen showed a stimulating effect: “Compared with placebo, jasmine oil caused significant increases of breathing rate, blood oxygen saturation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which indicated an increase of autonomic arousal. At the emotional level, subjects in the jasmine oil group rated themselves as more alert, more vigorous and less relaxed than subjects in the control group. This finding suggests an increase of subjective behavioral arousal. In conclusion, our results demonstrated the stimulating/activating effect of jasmine oil and provide evidence for its use in aromatherapy for the relief of depression and uplifting mood in humans.”[4]

References

^ 1. Journal of Health Research, vol. 27 no. 2, April 2013; 73-77.
^ 2. Retrieved February 26, 2014, from: Wheeling Jesuit University: http://www.wju.edu/about/adm_news_story:asp?iNewsID=539.
^ 3. Journal of Health Research, vol. 27 no. 2, April 2013; 73-77.
^ 4. Retrieved January 7, 2017 from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20184043
^ 5. Retrieved January 8, 2017 from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2529395/
^ 6. Retrieved 8/29/2014 from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1631328






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